Purple Carrots

 


Purple Carrots

Carrot is a root vegetable, which is an underground plant part eaten by humans as food. We have generally seen orange-colored carrots around us, but there are also purple, black, red, white, and yellow ones. The first carrots were purple and yellow, and Afganistan is the first place where domesticated carrots are seen. Purple carrots get purple colors from anthocyanin, acting as an antioxidant, and they can have a core in different colors like orange, yellow, white, and purple.


Carrots are rich in carotenoids, phenolic compounds, polyacetylenes, and vitamins. They are also a good source of antioxidants, anticarcinogens, and immune enhancers. But their nutraceutical components like carotenoids, antioxidant vitamins, and sugars change carrot to carrot depending on their colors. According to research, purple carrots contained 2.2 and 2.3 times more α- and β-carotenes, that the body converts into vitamin A than orange carrots, respectively. Also, the total anthocyanin content was high in purple/black carrots. Thus, they have more antioxidant effects than other colored carrots. 


Antioxidants can protect against oxidative stress known as the cell damage caused by free radicals. Oxidative stress has been connected to heart disease, cancer, arthritis, stroke, respiratory infections, immune deficiency, emphysema, Parkinson's disease, and other inflammatory or ischemic conditions. The fact that purple carrots are rich in antioxidants makes them more preferableSohumans may use purple carrots instead of other colored carrots to take advantage of its nutraceutical components.

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CONTENT: Deniz Güngören

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 REFERENCES 

 Alasalvar, C., Grigor, J. M., Zhang, D., Quantick, P. C., & Shahidi, F. (2001). Comparison of volatiles, phenolics, sugars, antioxidant vitamins, and sensory quality of different colored carrot varieties. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry49(3), 1410–1416. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf000595h 

Dias, J. (2014). Nutritional and Health Benefits of Carrots and Their Seed Extracts. Food and Nutrition Sciences, 05, 2147-2156.http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/fns.2014.522227

Stolarczyk, J. & Janick, J. (2011). ChronicaHORTICULTURAE. Carrot: History and Iconography, 53(2), 13-18.

Yoo, K.S., Bang, H., Pike, L. Patil, B.S. Lee, E.J. (2020). Comparing carotene, anthocyanins, and terpenoid concentrations in selected carrot lines of different colors. Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology. 61, 385–393. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13580-019-00225-6