Why is the Peach Surface Covered with a Hairy Structure?



Why is the Peach Surface Covered with a Hairy Structure?


Plant surfaces have an important effect in protecting against stress factors such as water losses, visible radiation, or extreme temperatures. These surfaces also play a crucial role as a defense barrier against pathogens[1].

 

The peach surface is covered with a dense hairy surface that can serve various protective purposes. It is named as fuzz, and it protects peach from external factors in several ways. This structure could be a useful evolutionary feature under some physical and biological circumstances[2].

 

Fruits generally suffer from moisture loss through evaporation, and this hairy structure prevents air from touching the fruit surface, thereby slowing evaporation and also minimizing moisture loss by keeping dew and rain slowing evaporation.

 

Another purpose of this protection shield is to protect them from insects. It seems that little bugs do not like to tickle when they walk along with the peach.

 

Not all peaches have such hairy structures. 

Nectarines are a cultivar of the peach which has a recessive gene that keeps its skin smooth. They also vary in taste and size. 

 

Peaches taken from the market do not have a very hairy surface because when the peach is harvested and taken to the distribution facilities, the feathers are brushed.

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CONTENT: Eren Başdemir

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REFERENCES



Riederer M, Müller CJeffree CH (2006) The fine structure of the plant cuticle. In Riederer M, Müller C, eds, Annual Plant Reviews, Vol 23: Biology of the Plant Cuticle. Blackwell, Oxford, pp 11–125



Fernández, V., Khayet, M., Montero-Prado, P., Heredia-Guerrero, J. A., Liakopoulos, G., Karabourniotis, G., … Heredia, A. (2011). New insights into the properties of pubescent surfaces: Peach fruit as a model. Plant Physiology156(4), 2098-2108. doi:10.1104/pp.111.176305